What is on my kitchen table right now?

Can you change the world from your kitchen table?

To see if you can, I invite six people around to chat about what bugs them the most – in the world, in our town, in our street, in my loungeroom (turns out it’s chiefly the little kids attached to participants, who make one hell of a racket the whole damn time!).  The idea is, me and lots of other people each get a little group together consisting of family, friends and randoms we met last night at the pub, and share what bothers us most and what we’d like to see change.  The whole process is recorded (literally in my case,on a little tape recorder which also comes in useful for interviews with underworld figures) then scrambled by an organisation called See-Change (get it? See…Change!) and provided to politicians so they can get to work doing what they’re sorta supposed to – carrying out the will of the People.

So, my neighbours and relllies being on the greenie, leftie side of things, the chat naturally turns to things like animal welfare, not towing refugees out to sea, the uncomfortably warm future foreseen for us by the International Commission on Climate Change, and how we wouldn’t mind paying more tax if we all GOT more for it.  I’m pretty sure most people who get involved in this kind of thing have the same bees in their bonnets, though. I can’t see a bunch of rednecks choosing to spend an hour chronicling their beefs with the world and then sending it off to an organisation whose claims to fame mostly involve growing organic veges on your townhouse terrace.  Unless you count talkback radio (the fuckhead’s forum).

And the politicians, when they get the hefty tome that is our collective opinion, will realise this.  They’ll either go ‘just as I thought’ (if they’re green left) or ‘bet they didn’t ask the local bankers/chicken farmers/mining magnates’ if they’re right of centre.

The biggest thing that came out of it for me was everybody’s sense of frustration.  The only time it remotely matters what Jim and Beth Citizen care about is Election Time – and then not much. The way the cookie crumbles on most things is beyond anyone’s control (except Mr Banker/Chicken farmer/Mining Magnate).  Ah, democracy.  Better than the other thing.

Oh, and what’s on my kitchen table right now? A lot of empty wine bottles.

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About turnipsforbreakfast

Rose has two blogs, www.butimbeautiful.wordpress.com, and www.turnipsforbreakfast.wordpress.com. Enjoy!
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10 Responses to What is on my kitchen table right now?

  1. Carrie Rubin says:

    Interesting concept. I suppose at the very least, you’re getting stimulating conversation with like-minded people. And wine.

    • Yeah! People seemed to have a good time. Apparently this kind of thing is really taking off, because people feel they don’t really have a voice. Maybe eventually democracy will be, hmm, more democratic.

  2. kingmidget says:

    Yeah, I’m right there with the sense of overwhelming frustration. We had an election a couple of weeks ago. I have voted in every election for more than 30 years. I seriously considered not voting this time around. I didn’t see the point. The wealthy and special interests have totally taken over elections and campaigns and politics. I’m feeling more and more that it’s pointless for people like me to vote. The other problem is that voter turnout is so low in this country in non-Presidential elections that about 20% of the adult population ends up deciding things. And that 20% is decidedly not on the same political wavelength as I am.

    • We get annoyed in Australia because the politicians do their wheeler-dealing in happy oblivion of what real people think. But what happens in the US is quite shocking – I guess partly due to the fact that you don’t have compulsory voting and so disqualifying and discouraging people from voting is a major political strategy there. Of course, here too young people sometimes don’t register when they’re 18 so they fall off the radar of the ‘voting compulsion’ authorities. Anyway, things have really got to change, and they will, when people step up and make them change.

      • kingmidget says:

        That’s what I’m afraid of. I don’t think enough people care that the change will come. There really needs to be a revolution of some kind. But people are too busy playing Angry Birds and posting selfies.

      • I kind of agree. I think there are people who have the time, money and education to push for change, and there are people who are pretty complacent or too uneducated to look outside their own circumstances – for those people, it takes a big kick up the butt to become more activist. Like deaths in the street, or food shortages or something – and even then there are lots of people who’ll just sit tight and hope for the best:)

  3. Well said. Have you got 38 degrees &/or change.org downunder? They are shaking a lot of trees, so change is possible.

    • Change.org – yep. Also something called Getup, which gets everybody onto a particular issue so the pollies can hear. They’re all fairly left leaning, but then I guess that’s because the left are generally the ones in favour of change in general.

  4. That is an exciting way to pass an evening. Plus only good can come of it (I reckon). Win/win. Good solution to the problem I’ve had of sort of wanting to participate but seriously not being up for going to a frikkin socialist workers party meeting or anything like that.

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